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You are required to write a 200 words essay reply with a least 2 peer view reference and also a relevant biblical concept to support your ideas. S. H. Case Study – Worth Ch. 11: Case 11.1 A and 11.1 B 1. In the cases above, do the ethical issues involve behavior of a fund-raiser, conditions placed on the gift or the impact of the gift on the organization’s mission and resources, characteristics or personal reputation of the donor, or concerns about privacy? 2. How would you handle the issues raised by each case? 3. After reflecting on the presentation viewed in this module/week, describe the parallels of Christian principles and ethical standards of business. Case 11.1 A My organization was faced with a decision after a donor offered a gift that would be recognized by naming a wing of the new building after the donor who contributed to the funding of this new building. The problem is that this donor’s company was linked to the mortgage crisis in the late 2000s, even though he was not directly involved in any illegal activity. However, the board is concerned that his reputation may not be the best and could tarnish the image of the organization by putting his name on the building. The board is also concern that he may be involved in business deals in the future that could be considered questionable. This problem is an ethical issue related to the poor image or reputation of the donor, rather than a staff member (Worth, 2014, p. 291). There is the risk of our image being damaged if we choose to associate the donor with our organization by recognizing the gift with his name on a wing of the building. However, after discussion it with the board, we decided to accept the gift, and create a gift agreement with the donor. The agreement would state that we have the right to remove the name from the building at any time should there be any unethical behavior by the donor in the future. There is the chance that he donor may be offended by the conditions, but I will be sure to address this issue respectfully. It is also very important to let him know that we are very appreciative of his gift, but we must stay true to our morals and values, and cannot risk ruining our reputation due to his unethical decisions. If the donor cannot accept these conditions, then we would not be able to accept his gift. Case 11.1 B At the gallery in which I am employed, a donor would like to give the gallery an art collection; however, she has provided conditions with the gift. The donor explained that she would like the gallery to be set-up like her home and she would like to be able to access the gallery at any time and use it for private events. The ethical problem here is that it is a “restricted gift,” (Worth, 2014, p. 292). While the donation of an art collection would be greatly appreciated, we would not be able to accept the gift. This organization is not a personal art gallery for the donors; it is a gallery to serve the community. It seems like the donor wants a free space for her own personal gallery and personal advantage. This does not tie in with the purpose of being a public art gallery for the public. I would just respectfully deny the donation in a letter with an outline of our mission and purpose and that while we appreciate the generosity, we cannot agree to those terms. Biblical Concept Integration The primary focus on this chapter is business ethics, principles and standards. While these things are important to any business or organization, it is especially important for Christian business owners. As Christians, our ethics and standards are not based on our own personal beliefs, but they should be founded on Biblical principles and concepts. Colossians 3:17 (ESV) says, “And whatever you do, in word or deed, do everything in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through him.” Another verse, Galatians 1:10 (ESV) says, “For am I now seeking the approval of man, or of God? Or am I trying to please man? If I were still trying to please man, I would not be a servant of Christ.” And finally, a third verse, Matthew 6:24 says, “No one can serve two masters, for either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve God and money.” Each of these verses are very clear on what God has to say about ethical behavior; while the two donations in the cases above are greatly appreciated, we cannot compromise our beliefs and the reputation of the organization by accepting donations from people who are not like-minded and do not agree with the purpose and vision of our organization. I know that God will always provide, and it may initially hurt financially to deny a gift, but when we are serving God, He will always provide. References Worth, M. J. (2014). Nonprofit Management: Principles and Practice (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, Ca: SAGE.

You are required to write a 200 words essay reply with a least 2 peer view reference and also a relevant biblical concept to support your ideas.

S. H.

Case Study – Worth Ch. 11: Case 11.1 A and 11.1 B

1. In the cases above, do the ethical issues involve behavior of a fund-raiser, conditions placed on the gift or the impact of the gift on the organization’s mission and resources, characteristics or personal reputation of the donor, or concerns about privacy?

2. How would you handle the issues raised by each case?

3. After reflecting on the presentation viewed in this module/week, describe the parallels of Christian principles and ethical standards of business.

Case 11.1 A

My organization was faced with a decision after a donor offered a gift that would be recognized by naming a wing of the new building after the donor who contributed to the funding of this new building. The problem is that this donor’s company was linked to the mortgage crisis in the late 2000s, even though he was not directly involved in any illegal activity. However, the board is concerned that his reputation may not be the best and could tarnish the image of the organization by putting his name on the building. The board is also concern that he may be involved in business deals in the future that could be considered questionable.

This problem is an ethical issue related to the poor image or reputation of the donor, rather than a staff member (Worth, 2014, p. 291). There is the risk of our image being damaged if we choose to associate the donor with our organization by recognizing the gift with his name on a wing of the building. However, after discussion it with the board, we decided to accept the gift, and create a gift agreement with the donor.

The agreement would state that we have the right to remove the name from the building at any time should there be any unethical behavior by the donor in the future. There is the chance that he donor may be offended by the conditions, but I will be sure to address this issue respectfully. It is also very important to let him know that we are very appreciative of his gift, but we must stay true to our morals and values, and cannot risk ruining our reputation due to his unethical decisions. If the donor cannot accept these conditions, then we would not be able to accept his gift.

Case 11.1 B

At the gallery in which I am employed, a donor would like to give the gallery an art collection; however, she has provided conditions with the gift. The donor explained that she would like the gallery to be set-up like her home and she would like to be able to access the gallery at any time and use it for private events. The ethical problem here is that it is a “restricted gift,” (Worth, 2014, p. 292).

While the donation of an art collection would be greatly appreciated, we would not be able to accept the gift. This organization is not a personal art gallery for the donors; it is a gallery to serve the community. It seems like the donor wants a free space for her own personal gallery and personal advantage. This does not tie in with the purpose of being a public art gallery for the public. I would just respectfully deny the donation in a letter with an outline of our mission and purpose and that while we appreciate the generosity, we cannot agree to those terms.

Biblical Concept Integration

The primary focus on this chapter is business ethics, principles and standards. While these things are important to any business or organization, it is especially important for Christian business owners. As Christians, our ethics and standards are not based on our own personal beliefs, but they should be founded on Biblical principles and concepts.

Colossians 3:17 (ESV) says, “And whatever you do, in word or deed, do everything in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through him.” Another verse, Galatians 1:10 (ESV) says, “For am I now seeking the approval of man, or of God? Or am I trying to please man? If I were still trying to please man, I would not be a servant of Christ.” And finally, a third verse, Matthew 6:24 says, “No one can serve two masters, for either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve God and money.”

Each of these verses are very clear on what God has to say about ethical behavior; while the two donations in the cases above are greatly appreciated, we cannot compromise our beliefs and the reputation of the organization by accepting donations from people who are not like-minded and do not agree with the purpose and vision of our organization. I know that God will always provide, and it may initially hurt financially to deny a gift, but when we are serving God, He will always provide.

 

 

References

Worth, M. J. (2014). Nonprofit Management: Principles and Practice (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, Ca: SAGE.

 

 

 

 

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