Interested in a PLAGIARISM-FREE paper based on these particular instructions?...with 100% confidentiality?

Order Now

COMMUNICATION THEORY (Participation Response) ATTACHED ONE TECHNOLOGY AND EDUCATION I have received an education in a variety of ways: classroom, correspondence, distance (computer with telephone access to teachers), and on-line. It may be argued that the classroom is best for childhood development due to the socialization aspect, yet, as an adult I believe the best education experience is from an on-line classroom. The reasons for this belief are many: technology allows fordue to technology concerns and also technology-based and Graduates of on-line universities are being prepared to face the new vision of the workplace. The office is now becoming an area of empty desks and meeting rooms, where those who need to be in an office are able to plug in their equipment, have their meetings, and then return home or on the road to their actual work space. On-line education exposes the graduate to this atmosphere where learning and collaboration is not only a classroom experience but a life-experience. My past foray into university was quite different from the experience at University of California. Expenses were similar with regard to course fees and texts, but other expenses such as dorm and transportation fees are non-existent at UC. Several of my first year classes at the other university had several hundred students. At UC, there are less than fifty. The lower class sizes allow for greater interaction with the professor, and the student is drawn down the path of critical thinking by comments provided by the professor to the student’s discussion responses. All professors expect that assignments will be completed and handed in, but the UC assignments are more frequent than any class assignments from other courses I’ve taken at other universities. This constant reflection helps me to assimilate and apply what I have learned. Another plus for on-line learning is access to the library for learning and research. The UC library is always open, which is a boon to learners who also have to work. The method of teaching where the content is read aloud by a professor does not work in an on-line environment. The professor can provide a module, insert links to entice further exploration, and direct a student to readings that enhance the learning. The plus for the teacher and student is that the student is dedicating that time to learning and there is no pressure to sit in a physical classroom, but the student can sit at home, in comfort, or in transit and still have a meaningful experience. The on-line university experience is ideal for the student who works full time and is pursuing a degree part-time, or for students from remote locations or due to special circumstances, who are compelled to stay where they are, and learn. Students with disabilities no longer need to move away from their supportive family or caregivers in order to obtain an education, nor are they compelled to find their way through masses of students rushing to classes (Creative Commons, 2012). I believe the digital means of obtaining an education will continue to gain acceptance. Where once the student needed to leave home to obtain an education, they can now learn wherever they are located. Technology allows the students the freedom to explore this education experience to the fullest. Solveig Creative Commons. (January, 2012). Online university education in Canada: challenges and opportunities. Human Resources and Skills Development Canada. Ottawa. Retrieved from: http://www.cvu-uvc.ca/Online%20University%20Education%20%20jan17%202012.pdf READ ATTACHED ONE AND RESPOND IN 75 WORDS. (Participation Response) ATTACHED TWO TECHNOLOGY AND EDUCATION In my opinion, Postman (1985) makes a legitimate argument with regards to his belief of human culture is often altered to suit technology advancement. Nevertheless, the culture each individual belongs, add significances and meanings to any lifeless technologies in a way that distinguishes one technology from another. Indeed, technology available today such as on-line education or social media would not present any differences in human life if no social interaction from a human being is associated with the technology; this echoes what Postman (1985) further states: “A medium is the social and intellectual environment a machine creates” (p. 84). The major difference between on-line education and campus one is obviously the location where the learning takes place. While a student’s physical presence is required for a campus class, on-line study makes it possible for anyone who intends to receive quality education at a place of their choice, at the time they feel appropriate, as long as the learners are prepared for the minimum technology requirement. Needless to mention that this convenience of on-line education that enjoyed by many was made possible by technology. Such technology promotes human beings to interact virtually through cyber activities (more and more technologies formed); when individuals are getting more and more comfortable and addicted (we change the way we live as these new technologies become part of our life) to explore greater possibilities technology can achieve, on-line education was one of the outcomes came along with technology advancement. On-line study at UCW is definitely a valid medium of education which satisfies precisely what I seek in terms of both personal and academic improvements. Unlike a campus education where communication is typically conducted verbally, an on-line class employs a unique technique which requires students to communicate through extensive reading and writing in order for things to make sense. While the apparent benefit of studying on-line is the flexibility of receiving education according to individual’s pace, the key motivation for me in taking virtual classes is to force myself to build stronger reading, writing, and thinking abilities. Combining the flexibility and specific trainings in the areas of my interest, on-line study serves the function of a quality education for me. It goes without saying that this can also go the opposite direction for some; individuals whose idea of education can only be done through in person interaction, they might not regard on-line study as the fertilizer they need in education. On-line education through the format UCW provides is a better education for me personal for another reason; it is a type of learning that encourages critical thinking more than it is required in a campus class. While a typical classroom education spends most of time on one-way class material lecturing from the instructor, an on-line classroom involves relatively frequent constructive comments from both instructors and students. An article by Pandolfo (2012) describes the role of virtual instructors: “virtual teachers focus on how to keep student enrolled rather than how to teach them”, which I personally find it true with my experience with UCW. Lastly, Pandolfo (2012) concludes that online education is especially effective for learners who are self-motivated; self-reflective and independent are also referred as excellent qualities if one is considering receiving education or training on-line. In conclusion, in order to be a part of this on-line education (technology), I have changed my daily routing to suit this additional role I am hoping to adapt (my culture has been altered because of technology). Although technology opens up the possibility for anyone to enjoy learning at their convenience through on-line study (presence of technology), it is not quite qualified as a quality education without individual’s intellectual contribution (culture makes the technology meaningful). As Postman (1985) points out that every technology has its bias (p. 85), it is important to recognize that effort should be spent towards to bring out the best of technology, instead of the other way around. Makayla Reference: Pandolfo, N. (2012, June 13). The teacher you’ve never met: Inside an online high school class. Time.com. Retrieved from http://content.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,2117085,00.html Postman, N. (1985) Amusing ourselves to death. New York: Penguin Books. READ ATTACHED TWO AND RESPOND IN 75 WORDS. (Participation Response) ATTACHED THREE CULTURAL APPEARANCE AND ETHICS. Participation Response As with many new technological implementations, some effects are known, and some are not. We then need to look at potential risks in order to lessen or eliminate them altogether. Developing a morally sound approach is only as valid as the ethics and morals of the individuals who use new technology and for what purpose. As with most new inventions, there are upsides and downsides, but it’s assessing the potential risks which are unknown that is difficult. Potential risks require a mitigation plan which includes a strategy to collect information, assess the risks, develop intelligence, then plan and execute. (Deloitte & Touche, N.d.) If we don’t know what the impact will be, then the focus would rely solely on “what ifs.” And while we don’t know what the outcome will be, we do have some idea to some degree to the impact it may cause or may not. We are now looking at possibilities instead of concrete evidence from studies. Studies of the impact are noteworthy in cases of the unknown, but the context changes when we take that technology to another level such as global. Risks vary depending on the purpose. Differing purposes such as educational, business, or personal will all have different levels of risks. Developing a morally sound approach in this circumstance is risky itself because we base it on the unknown. \ Monique Reference: Deloitte & Touche LLP. (n.d.). Enterprise 2.0: harnessing Social Media. Retrieved from http://www.deloitte.com/assets/…/ca_en_ers_enterprise_20_050611.pdf READ ATTACHED THREE AND RESPOND IN 75 WORDS. (Participation Response) ATTACHED FOUR CULTURAL APPEARANCE AND ETHICS. Participation Response It is truly difficult to know what technology can do in the future. But it is even more difficult to know how it will be used. Ethically or not? There are several cases in the history of technology were we have learnt the above lessons of technology not being used ethically. One way to approach this could be through laws. Laws created and implemented to keep use of technology in the check, ensuring it used ethically. Laws which transcend time and have the ability to enforce unethical use of future technology. This could have its limitations, as no one has seen the future and use of technology. It would have to be with a stature of flexibility in the law that the implementation would need to occur. They would also have to be some generic ground that the law would cover to ensure future technology is not unethically used. And when that technology comes forth and is better understood then the laws would have to be amended to make them more specific and geared towards the ethical use of that technology.

COMMUNICATION THEORY (Participation Response)

ATTACHED ONE
TECHNOLOGY AND EDUCATION
I have received an education in a variety of ways: classroom, correspondence, distance (computer with telephone access to teachers), and on-line. It may be argued that the classroom is best for childhood development due to the socialization aspect, yet, as an adult I believe the best education experience is from an on-line classroom. The reasons for this belief are many: technology allows fordue to technology concerns and also technology-based and
Graduates of on-line universities are being prepared to face the new vision of the workplace. The office is now becoming an area of empty desks and meeting rooms, where those who need to be in an office are able to plug in their equipment, have their meetings, and then return home or on the road to their actual work space. On-line education exposes the graduate to this atmosphere where learning and collaboration is not only a classroom experience but a life-experience.
My past foray into university was quite different from the experience at University of California. Expenses were similar with regard to course fees and texts, but other expenses such as dorm and transportation fees are non-existent at UC. Several of my first year classes at the other university had several hundred students. At UC, there are less than fifty. The lower class sizes allow for greater interaction with the professor, and the student is drawn down the path of critical thinking by comments provided by the professor to the student’s discussion responses. All professors expect that assignments will be completed and handed in, but the UC assignments are more frequent than any class assignments from other courses I’ve taken at other universities. This constant reflection helps me to assimilate and apply what I have learned. Another plus for on-line learning is access to the library for learning and research. The UC library is always open, which is a boon to learners who also have to work.
The method of teaching where the content is read aloud by a professor does not work in an on-line environment. The professor can provide a module, insert links to entice further exploration, and direct a student to readings that enhance the learning. The plus for the teacher and student is that the student is dedicating that time to learning and there is no pressure to sit in a physical classroom, but the student can sit at home, in comfort, or in transit and still have a meaningful experience.
The on-line university experience is ideal for the student who works full time and is pursuing a degree part-time, or for students from remote locations or due to special circumstances, who are compelled to stay where they are, and learn. Students with disabilities no longer need to move away from their supportive family or caregivers in order to obtain an education, nor are they compelled to find their way through masses of students rushing to classes (Creative Commons, 2012).
I believe the digital means of obtaining an education will continue to gain acceptance. Where once the student needed to leave home to obtain an education, they can now learn wherever they are located. Technology allows the students the freedom to explore this education experience to the fullest.
Solveig
Creative Commons. (January, 2012). Online university education in Canada: challenges and opportunities. Human Resources and Skills Development Canada. Ottawa. Retrieved from: http://www.cvu-uvc.ca/Online%20University%20Education%20%20jan17%202012.pdf
READ ATTACHED ONE AND RESPOND IN 75 WORDS. (Participation Response)
ATTACHED TWO
TECHNOLOGY AND EDUCATION
In my opinion, Postman (1985) makes a legitimate argument with regards to his belief of human culture is often altered to suit technology advancement. Nevertheless, the culture each individual belongs, add significances and meanings to any lifeless technologies in a way that distinguishes one technology from another. Indeed, technology available today such as on-line education or social media would not present any differences in human life if no social interaction from a human being is associated with the technology; this echoes what Postman (1985) further states: “A medium is the social and intellectual environment a machine creates” (p. 84).
The major difference between on-line education and campus one is obviously the location where the learning takes place. While a student’s physical presence is required for a campus class, on-line study makes it possible for anyone who intends to receive quality education at a place of their choice, at the time they feel appropriate, as long as the learners are prepared for the minimum technology requirement. Needless to mention that this convenience of on-line education that enjoyed by many was made possible by technology. Such technology promotes human beings to interact virtually through cyber activities (more and more technologies formed); when individuals are getting more and more comfortable and addicted (we change the way we live as these new technologies become part of our life) to explore greater possibilities technology can achieve, on-line education was one of the outcomes came along with technology advancement.
On-line study at UCW is definitely a valid medium of education which satisfies precisely what I seek in terms of both personal and academic improvements. Unlike a campus education where communication is typically conducted verbally, an on-line class employs a unique technique which requires students to communicate through extensive reading and writing in order for things to make sense. While the apparent benefit of studying on-line is the flexibility of receiving education according to individual’s pace, the key motivation for me in taking virtual classes is to force myself to build stronger reading, writing, and thinking abilities. Combining the flexibility and specific trainings in the areas of my interest, on-line study serves the function of a quality education for me. It goes without saying that this can also go the opposite direction for some; individuals whose idea of education can only be done through in person interaction, they might not regard on-line study as the fertilizer they need in education.
On-line education through the format UCW provides is a better education for me personal for another reason; it is a type of learning that encourages critical thinking more than it is required in a campus class. While a typical classroom education spends most of time on one-way class material lecturing from the instructor, an on-line classroom involves relatively frequent constructive comments from both instructors and students. An article by Pandolfo (2012) describes the role of virtual instructors: “virtual teachers focus on how to keep student enrolled rather than how to teach them”, which I personally find it true with my experience with UCW. Lastly, Pandolfo (2012) concludes that online education is especially effective for learners who are self-motivated; self-reflective and independent are also referred as excellent qualities if one is considering receiving education or training on-line.
In conclusion, in order to be a part of this on-line education (technology), I have changed my daily routing to suit this additional role I am hoping to adapt (my culture has been altered because of technology). Although technology opens up the possibility for anyone to enjoy learning at their convenience through on-line study (presence of technology), it is not quite qualified as a quality education without individual’s intellectual contribution (culture makes the technology meaningful). As Postman (1985) points out that every technology has its bias (p. 85), it is important to recognize that effort should be spent towards to bring out the best of technology, instead of the other way around.
Makayla
Reference:
Pandolfo, N. (2012, June 13). The teacher you’ve never met: Inside an online high school class. Time.com. Retrieved from http://content.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,2117085,00.html

Postman, N. (1985) Amusing ourselves to death. New York: Penguin Books.
READ ATTACHED TWO AND RESPOND IN 75 WORDS. (Participation Response)

 

ATTACHED THREE
CULTURAL APPEARANCE AND ETHICS.
Participation Response
As with many new technological implementations, some effects are known, and some are not. We then need to look at potential risks in order to lessen or eliminate them altogether. Developing a morally sound approach is only as valid as the ethics and morals of the individuals who use new technology and for what purpose. As with most new inventions, there are upsides and downsides, but it’s assessing the potential risks which are unknown that is difficult. Potential risks require a mitigation plan which includes a strategy to collect information, assess the risks, develop intelligence, then plan and execute. (Deloitte & Touche, N.d.) If we don’t know what the impact will be, then the focus would rely solely on “what ifs.” And while we don’t know what the outcome will be, we do have some idea to some degree to the impact it may cause or may not. We are now looking at possibilities instead of concrete evidence from studies. Studies of the impact are noteworthy in cases of the unknown, but the context changes when we take that technology to another level such as global. Risks vary depending on the purpose. Differing purposes such as educational, business, or personal will all have different levels of risks. Developing a morally sound approach in this circumstance is risky itself because we base it on the unknown. \

Monique

Reference:
Deloitte & Touche LLP. (n.d.). Enterprise 2.0: harnessing Social Media. Retrieved from http://www.deloitte.com/assets/…/ca_en_ers_enterprise_20_050611.pdf
READ ATTACHED THREE AND RESPOND IN 75 WORDS. (Participation Response)
ATTACHED FOUR
CULTURAL APPEARANCE AND ETHICS.
Participation Response
It is truly difficult to know what technology can do in the future. But it is even more difficult to know how it will be used. Ethically or not?
There are several cases in the history of technology were we have learnt the above lessons of technology not being used ethically.
One way to approach this could be through laws. Laws created and implemented to keep use of technology in the check, ensuring it used ethically. Laws which transcend time and have the ability to enforce unethical use of future technology. This could have its limitations, as no one has seen the future and use of technology. It would have to be with a stature of flexibility in the law that the implementation would need to occur. They would also have to be some generic ground that the law would cover to ensure future technology is not unethically used. And when that technology comes forth and is better understood then the laws would have to be amended to make them more specific and geared towards the ethical use of that technology.

Interested in a PLAGIARISM-FREE paper based on these particular instructions?...with 100% confidentiality?

Order Now