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Research Paper Proposal NOTE: This is an East Asian Political Class so the topic needs to regard about following countries. Taiwan, South Korea, China, or Japan All students must submit a research proposal, based on the literature review on the topic under study (at minimum, 15 academic papers or books must be listed), which clearly state: 1) the topic of the paper, 2) the research question, 3) how this research question is generated from the academic debate, 4) why this question is important in the academic field, 5) how you will address this question, and 6) what are major sources of your research paper. See the term paper guidelines for details. Students are required to read term-paper guidelines at the end of this syllabus, and plagiarism policy. TOPIC: How has the Chinese Political structure changed its economy? I’ve uploaded my class syllabus so you can get a better idea what kind of paper the teacher wants. East Asian Politics Syllabus Required Books: Sujian Guo, Chinese Politics and Government: Power, Ideology and Organization (Routledge, 2012) Louis D. Hayes, Introduction to Japanese Politics (New York: Paragon House, 2001) Soong Hoom Kil and Chung-in Moon, Understanding Korean Politics (Albany: SUNY Press, 2001) John F. Copper, Taiwan: Nation-State or Province? (Westview, 1999) In addition, some supplementary reading materials (book chapters and journal articles) are placed on the electronic reserves, which are included on ilearn. PPT lectures are also provided on ilearn. Reading all the assigned texts and materials is mandatory and will be tested accordingly. Course Objectives: East Asia is one of the most important regions in the world. East Asia contains the most rapidly growing economies in the world, the second largest economy of Japan, an emerging power of China, and many actual and potential points of conflict, all of which could pose serious challenges to the US foreign policy in the 21st century. This course is designed to provide a basic understanding of government and politics in the countries of East Asia including China, Japan, South Korea and Taiwan. The course will examine and compare the major aspects and functions of political systems, processes, and changes in each pair of these countries to explore the general patterns of similarities and differences that exist among these nations and the dynamics that are deep-seated in their political and economic changes. The course will conduct a systematic comparison between nations utilizing a set of common integrated themes for each pair of countries under study: political culture, political development, political institution, political process, political economy, and political change. This course is also designed to prepare students for their future career development in foreign policy areas and international organizations concerning China and East Asia, and serve as an adequate basis for further study. (regional123) Research Paper Proposal All students must submit a research proposal, based on the literature review on the topic under study (at minimum, 15 academic papers or books must be listed), which clearly state: 1) the topic of the paper, 2) the research question, 3) how this research question is generated from the academic debate, 4) why this question is important in the academic field, 5) how you will address this question, and 6) what are major sources of your research paper. See the term paper guidelines for details. Students are required to read term-paper guidelines at the end of this syllabus, and plagiarism policy. You should be free to choose a topic on your own. But, do not turn in a paper that was prepared for a different class. As a general rule, a topic for the paper must be closely related to the course theme or some aspects of the subject matter and the countries covered in this course. Research Paper. You are also required to write a research paper on the course theme. Your paper should be typed in double space, and 15-20 pages in length. It will be always helpful to search the Internet for the reference. But your main sources of citation must be academic journals and books. At a minimum you should use 15 sources of academic journal articles and books. You must use correct citation for your paper. Plagiarism is when you use someone else’s words or ideas without attributing the proper source. Feel free to rely on someone else’s words, concepts, arguments, ideas, explanations, or descriptions, but make sure that anything you cite from the literature or anything that is not yours must be properly footnoted. Students will receive F’s for plagiarized work. Your paper must conform to college-level standards of quality. Poor grammar or spelling and improper citation style will be counted against your grade. Course Schedule and Reading Assignment I. Introducing Asian Politics Introduction to Asian politics Readings: *Milton W. Meyer, “Introducing Asia,” Asia (Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 1997), pp. 1-31 (on electronic reserves) II. China and Japan Land and People: Political Implications for the Making of the State Readings:Guo, Chapter 3 Louis D. Hayes, Introduction *Karl Wittfogel, Oriental Despotism Political Culture: Confucianism vs. Japanese Adaptations Readings: Guo, Chapter 4 *Shu-Hsien Liu, “Confucius” in Shu-Hsien Liu, Understanding Confucian Philosophy: Classical and Sung-Ming (Westport and London: Praeger, 1998), pp. 15-32 (on e-reserves) *Makoto Ohtsu and Tomio Imanari, “Japanese National Values and Confucianism,” The Japanese Economy, vol. 27, no. 2, 1999, pp. 45-59 (on e-reserves) Political Development: from Imperial Rule to Communism and Fascism Readings: Guo, Chapter 5 Louis D. Hayes, Chapters 1-2 *Peter R. Moody, Jr. “Traditional Societies and the New World Order,” in Tradition and Modernization in China and Japan (Belmont, CA: Wadsworth, 1995), pp. 106-127 (on e-reserves) Political Institutions: Leninist Party State vs. Constitutional Democracy Readings: Guo, Chapter 9-10 Louis D. Hayes, Chapters 3-5 *Sujian Guo, “The Party-State Relationship in Post-Mao China,” China Report: A Journal of East Asian Studies, vol. 37, no. 3, 2001, pp. 301-315 (on e-reserves) Political Economy: Socialist Market Economy vs. Corporatist Developmental State Readings: Guo, Chapter 15-16 Louis D. Hayes, Chapter 9 *Chalmers Johnson, MITI and the Japanese Miracle: The Growth of International Policy, 1925-1975 (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1982), pp3-34. (on electronic reserves) Political Change: Transition from Communism vs. Transition from One-Party Domination Readings: *Lucian W. Pye, “An Overview of 50 Years of the People’s Republic of China: Some Progress, but Big Problems Remain,” The China Quarterly, no. 159, September 1999, pp. 569-579 (on electronic reserves) *Sue Ellen M. Charlton, “China: The Party-State System,” in Comparing Asian Politics (Westview, 1997) (on electronic reserves) *Ronald J. Hrebenar, “The Changing Postwar Party System,” in Japan’s New Party System (Westview, 2000) (on electronic reserves) III. Taiwan and South Korea Land and People: Taiwan and South Korea at a Glance Readings:*James C.F. Wang, Comparative Asian Politics: Power, Policy, and Change (Prentice Hall, 1994), pp. 108-110 Copper, Chapter 1 Kil and Moon, pp. 1-23 Political Culture: Confucianism vs. Korean adaptations Readings: Copper, pp. 13-16; 61-67 Kil and Moon, pp. 24-28 *Jahyun Kim Haboush, “The Confucianization of Korean Society,” in Gilbert Rozman, ed., The East Asian Region: Confucian Heritage and Its Modern Adaptation (Princeton University Press, 1991) (on e-reserves) Political Development: from Colonialism to Authoritarianism Readings:*James C.F. Wang, Comparative Asian Politics: Power, Policy, and Change (Prentice Hall, 1994), pp. 111-128 Copper, Chapter 2 Kil and Moon, Chapter 3 Political Institutions: Presidential System Readings:*James C.F. Wang, Comparative Asian Politics: Power, Policy, and Change (Prentice Hall, 1994), pp. 118-142 Copper, Chapter 4 Kil and Moon, Chapter 4 Political Economy: East Asian Model Readings: Copper, Chapter 5 Kil and Moon, Chapter 8 *Robert Wade, Governing the Market: Economic Theory and the Role of Government in East Asian Industrialization (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1990), chapter 1 (on electronic reserves) *Howard Handelman, “The Political Economy of Third World Development,” in The Challenge of Third World Development (New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 1996), pp. 216-244 (on electronic reserves) Political Change: Transition from Authoritarian Rule to Constitutional Democracy Readings: *Nicholas Eberstadt, “Taiwan and South Korea: the ‘Democratization’ of Outlier States,” World Affairs, vol. 155, no. 2, 1992 (on e-reserves) *Jauhsieh Joseph Wu, Taiwan’s Democratization: Forces Behind the New Momentum (Hong Kong, Oxford University Press, 1995), Chapter 3 (on e-reserves) *Tun-jen Cheng and Eun Mee Kim, “Making Democracy: Generalizing the South Korean Case,” in Edward Friedman, ed., The Politics of Democratization: Generalizing East Asian Experience (Boulder, CO: Westview, 1994), pp. 148-160 (on e-reserves) East Asian Security and the U.S. Foreign Policy Readings:*James C.F. Wang, Comparative Asian Politics: Power, Policy, and Change (Prentice Hall, 1994), pp. 333-344 *Quansheng Zhao, “China and Major Power Relations in East Asia,” Journal of Contemporary China, vol. 10, no. 29, 2001, pp. 663-681 (on electronic reserves) *Barry Buzan and Gerald Segal, “Rethinking East Asian Security,” Survival, vol. 36, no. 2, 1994 (on electronic reserves) *Howard J. Wiarda, “From Cold War to Post-Cold War: Change and Continuity in U.S. Foreign and Strategic Policy,” Contributions in Political Science, vol. 366, no. 1, 1996 (on electronic reserves) *Haruhiro Fukui and Shigeko N. Fukai, “The Role of the United States in Post-Cold War East Asian Security Affairs,” Journal of Asian and African Studies, vol. 33. No. 1, 1998 (on electronic reserves) *Ted G. Carpenter, “Managing a Great Power Relationship: The United States, China, and East Asian Security,” The Journal of Strategic Studies, vol. 21, no. 1, 1998 (on electronic reserves) —————————————————————————————————- Term Paper Assignments and General Guidelines I. PAPER ASSIGNMENTS 1.In addition to a set of homework assignments, you are required to turn in a college-level analytical paper as a requirement of this course. Your paper should be typed in double space, 15-20 pages in length, and nicely bonded. Your paper must apply aspects of the assigned readings to your topic. In additional to that, at a minimum you should use 15 sources beyond the assigned readings. 2. You must use correct citation for your paper. Plagiarism is when you use someone else’s words or ideas without attributing the proper source. Feel free to rely on someone else’s words, concepts, arguments, ideas, explanations, or descriptions, but make sure that anything you cite from the literature or anything that is not yours must be properly footnoted. Students will receive F’s for plagiarized work. It will be always helpful to search the Internet for the reference. But your main sources of citation must be academic journals and books. Acadmic Elite Search or ArticleFirst in library databases on the web is the best place to start with. You can always ask the reference desk for assistance. 3. Late paper will not be accepted without a convincing excuse. You must try to write a sensibly organized paper with a clear central theme. 4. You should be free to choose a topic on your own. But, do not turn in a paper that was prepared for a different class. As a general rule, a topic for the paper must be closely related to aspects of the subject matter under topics covered in this course. Therefore, a self-selected topic for the paper must be submitted in writing and approved by the instructor as early as possible.Your paper with a self-selected topic will not be accepted (you will receive a zero score) without my pre-approval. You are required to submit a topic proposal, which includes “What is the paper topic,” “what is your research question,” “why this question,” “how to solve this question,” and “what are the major sources for your research” on or before the deadline. 5. No cover or binding on your paper please! Include a cover sheet with your paper title and your name, and email the paper to me. 6. Your paper must conform to college-level standards of quality. Poor grammar or spelling and improper citation style will be counted against your grade. Your paper will be graded on the following criteria: (1) your command of the material; (2) your analytical and critical skills; (3) your writing skills (clarity, organization, grammar, and spelling); (4) your use of the readings; and (5) those critical aspects of writing a good paper addressed in the general guidelines. By consulting the following general guidelines, you should get a good idea of how your paper will be evaluated. II. GENERAL GUIDELINES There are two general types of college-level paper: research paper and analytical paper. A research paper, strictly speaking, should be conducted by utilizing statistical methods or experimental methods and operationalizing the key research elements in the research process, such as problem, hypothesis, research design, measurement, data collection, data analysis, and generalization. Your term paper belongs to the latter. An analytical paper can be further classified into “descriptive” and “explanatory.” Your paper can be either a descriptive or explanatory analytical paper. Both require you to explain something. If you describe changes of institutions, patterns of behavior, or policies, you are not simply describing them for nothing, but for explaining something. A paper that merely reports what others have said or describes something will give you neither psychic satisfaction nor a good grade. Your task is not merely to assemble facts, but to interpret or explain the facts. An analytical paper is the most basic one; but it is not easy to do a good job. I will try to make it as simple and clear as possible in the following. To do a good work on an analytical paper, just as for any type of paper, the first thing you need is to choose or set up a topic, such as “Democratic Transition: A comparative Study of Taiwan and Vietnam,” which usually defines the parameters within which your (research) question or a thesis is proposed, the relevant literature is selected and integrated either to support or refute the thesis, your evaluation is conducted based upon the criteria you set up, and some conclusions you will draw based upon your evaluation. Your work needs a thesis/theme for a paper that opens and closes the work. The question you want to work on implies a thesis or theme. At the end of your paper, you need to complete the “circle” by linking the opening of your paper with the closing of the paper. With a thesis or theme, you can work on integration and linkages of materials – paragraph to paragraph, literature to literature. With a thesis or theme, you know what you want to do or what problem or puzzle you want to solve – you may defend or refute the thesis, or by doing so, you may come up with a synthesis – breaking the ground. This is your introduction (I. Introduction). The next step is the definitional work on some key terms and to establish evaluation criteria by which you examine the state, development, change, or reality of the subject matter. That is to say, you have to define the key term “democratic transition” or any key concepts to be used in your paper. You can do this either in your introduction section or do this as an individual part of the main body (II. Defining Key Concepts). If you choose to do this in your introduction section, you will not have this particular section, which means that you will simply borrow or accept the definition of concepts established by other major work in the literature. If you need an additional section for this work, you first search the relevant literature to synthesize the material into different definitions or contrasting views on “democratic transition” by referring to some major work in the literature, because “democratic transition” could mean different things to different peoples. Only by defining the key terms and establishing evaluation criteria, your following examination can provide a valid justification for your thesis developed in your introduction. What follows is to engage in the investigation of real world or examination of empirical facts along some dimensions through a substantial literature research. This is a major part of the paper body (III. Examination). Evaluation of the results (IV. Analysis). This is actually a concluding part of your paper. Or, this can be a substantial part of the main body of your paper, if you want to have an additional concluding section. You can do it either way; it is up to you. Only listing or lumping facts together about, for example, the religion suppression, is not sufficient; instead you need to show that you are able to draw conclusions from the materials under your investigation (or you have studied). At this stage, you can apply the criteria you have established in section I or II and draw conclusions from the material. Your conclusions are actually your interpretation of the results of your evaluation of your subject, and expected to support or restate the thesis you have proposed at the beginning – by so doing you complete the “circle.” This section should also include any insightful reflections and thought on the discussion of the subject matter. If you choose to have an additional concluding chapter, which is the most common way people choose, you simply recapture, in brief fashion, the thesis or theme proposed at the beginning, the major empirical evidence that supports or refutes the thesis, and the conclusion you have made based upon your analysis. Finally, the format of your paper is also essential. The format must always include a title page, abstract if necessary, table of contents, text or body of the paper, sections with subtitles, and footnotes or references. Do not forget to do the page number! Note: If you choose to do a research paper by utilizing statistical methods or experimental methods, you must first discuss with me the key research elements in the research process, such as problem, hypothesis, research design, measurement, data collection, data analysis, and generalization. I hope these general guidelines will be helpful either for your efforts to write your paper or for your long-term benefit at university. Work hard and commit yourself to excellence, and you will always be highly rewarded. Thank you for choosing my class as the media of your leaning process. Good luck and enjoy your work.

Research Paper Proposal
NOTE: This is an East Asian Political Class so the topic needs to regard about following countries.
Taiwan, South Korea, China, or Japan

All students must submit a research proposal, based on the literature review on the topic under study (at minimum, 15 academic papers or books must be listed), which clearly state: 1) the topic of the paper, 2) the research question, 3) how this research question is generated from the academic debate, 4) why this question is important in the academic field, 5) how you will address this question, and 6) what are major sources of your research paper.  See the term paper guidelines for details. Students are required to read term-paper guidelines at the end of this syllabus, and plagiarism policy.

TOPIC:

How has the Chinese Political structure changed its economy?

I’ve uploaded my class syllabus so you can get a better idea what kind of paper the teacher wants.

East Asian Politics Syllabus

Required Books:

Sujian Guo, Chinese Politics and Government: Power, Ideology and Organization (Routledge, 2012)

Louis D. Hayes, Introduction to Japanese Politics (New York: Paragon House, 2001)

Soong Hoom Kil and Chung-in Moon, Understanding Korean Politics (Albany: SUNY Press, 2001)

John F. Copper, Taiwan: Nation-State or Province? (Westview, 1999)

 

In addition, some supplementary reading materials (book chapters and journal articles) are placed on the electronic reserves, which are included on ilearn. PPT lectures are also provided on ilearn. Reading all the assigned texts and materials is mandatory and will be tested accordingly.

 

Course Objectives:

 

East Asia is one of the most important regions in the world. East Asia contains the most rapidly growing economies in the world, the second largest economy of Japan, an emerging power of China, and many actual and potential points of conflict, all of which could pose serious challenges to the US foreign policy in the 21st century.

 

This course is designed to provide a basic understanding of government and politics in the countries of East Asia including China, Japan, South Korea and Taiwan. The course will examine and compare the major aspects and functions of political systems, processes, and changes in each pair of these countries to explore the general patterns of similarities and differences that exist among these nations and the dynamics that are deep-seated in their political and economic changes. The course will conduct a systematic comparison between nations utilizing a set of common integrated themes for each pair of countries under study: political culture, political development, political institution, political process, political economy, and political change.

 

This course is also designed to prepare students for their future career development in foreign policy areas and international organizations concerning China and East Asia, and serve as an adequate basis for further study. regional123)

 

 

Research Paper Proposal

 

All students must submit a research proposal, based on the literature review on the topic under study (at minimum, 15 academic papers or books must be listed), which clearly state: 1) the topic of the paper, 2) the research question, 3) how this research question is generated from the academic debate, 4) why this question is important in the academic field, 5) how you will address this question, and 6) what are major sources of your research paper. See the term paper guidelines for details. Students are required to read term-paper guidelines at the end of this syllabus, and plagiarism policy.

 

 

You should be free to choose a topic on your own. But, do not turn in a paper that was prepared for a different class. As a general rule, a topic for the paper must be closely related to the course theme or some aspects of the subject matter and the countries covered in this course.

 

 

Research Paper. You are also required to write a research paper on the course theme. Your paper should be typed in double space, and 15-20 pages in length. It will be always helpful to search the Internet for the reference. But your main sources of citation must be academic journals and books. At a minimum you should use 15 sources of academic journal articles and books. You must use correct citation for your paper. Plagiarism is when you use someone else’s words or ideas without attributing the proper source. Feel free to rely on someone else’s words, concepts, arguments, ideas, explanations, or descriptions, but make sure that anything you cite from the literature or anything that is not yours must be properly footnoted. Students will receive F’s for plagiarized work. Your paper must conform to college-level standards of quality. Poor grammar or spelling and improper citation style will be counted against your grade.

 

Course Schedule and Reading Assignment

I. Introducing Asian Politics

 

Introduction to Asian politics

Readings: *Milton W. Meyer, “Introducing Asia,” Asia (Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 1997), pp. 1-31 (on electronic reserves)

 

II. China and Japan

 

Land and People: Political Implications for the Making of the State

Readings:Guo, Chapter 3

Louis D. Hayes, Introduction

*Karl Wittfogel, Oriental Despotism

 

Political Culture: Confucianism vs. Japanese Adaptations

Readings: Guo, Chapter 4

*Shu-Hsien Liu, “Confucius” in Shu-Hsien Liu, Understanding Confucian Philosophy: Classical and Sung-Ming (Westport and London: Praeger, 1998), pp. 15-32 (on e-reserves)

*Makoto Ohtsu and Tomio Imanari, “Japanese National Values and Confucianism,” The Japanese Economy, vol. 27, no. 2, 1999, pp. 45-59 (on e-reserves)

 

Political Development: from Imperial Rule to Communism and Fascism

Readings: Guo, Chapter 5

Louis D. Hayes, Chapters 1-2

*Peter R. Moody, Jr. “Traditional Societies and the New World Order,” in Tradition and Modernization in China and Japan (Belmont, CA: Wadsworth, 1995), pp. 106-127 (on e-reserves)

 

Political Institutions: Leninist Party State vs. Constitutional Democracy

Readings: Guo, Chapter 9-10

Louis D. Hayes, Chapters 3-5

*Sujian Guo, “The Party-State Relationship in Post-Mao China,” China Report: A Journal of East Asian Studies, vol. 37, no. 3, 2001, pp. 301-315 (on e-reserves)

 

Political Economy: Socialist Market Economy vs. Corporatist Developmental State

Readings: Guo, Chapter 15-16

Louis D. Hayes, Chapter 9

*Chalmers Johnson, MITI and the Japanese Miracle: The Growth of International Policy,

1925-1975 (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1982), pp3-34. (on electronic reserves)

 

Political Change: Transition from Communism vs. Transition from One-Party Domination

Readings: *Lucian W. Pye, “An Overview of 50 Years of the People’s Republic of China: Some Progress, but Big Problems Remain,” The China Quarterly, no. 159, September 1999, pp. 569-579 (on electronic reserves)

*Sue Ellen M. Charlton, “China: The Party-State System,” in Comparing Asian Politics (Westview, 1997) (on electronic reserves)

*Ronald J. Hrebenar, “The Changing Postwar Party System,” in Japan’s New Party System (Westview, 2000) (on electronic reserves)

III. Taiwan and South Korea

Land and People: Taiwan and South Korea at a Glance

Readings:*James C.F. Wang, Comparative Asian Politics: Power, Policy, and Change (Prentice Hall, 1994), pp. 108-110

Copper, Chapter 1

Kil and Moon, pp. 1-23

 

Political Culture: Confucianism vs. Korean adaptations

Readings: Copper, pp. 13-16; 61-67

Kil and Moon, pp. 24-28

*Jahyun Kim Haboush, “The Confucianization of Korean Society,” in Gilbert Rozman, ed., The East Asian Region: Confucian Heritage and Its Modern Adaptation (Princeton University Press, 1991) (on e-reserves)

 

Political Development: from Colonialism to Authoritarianism

Readings:*James C.F. Wang, Comparative Asian Politics: Power, Policy, and Change (Prentice Hall, 1994), pp. 111-128

Copper, Chapter 2

Kil and Moon, Chapter 3

 

Political Institutions: Presidential System

Readings:*James C.F. Wang, Comparative Asian Politics: Power, Policy, and Change (Prentice Hall, 1994), pp. 118-142

Copper, Chapter 4

Kil and Moon, Chapter 4

 

Political Economy: East Asian Model

Readings: Copper, Chapter 5

Kil and Moon, Chapter 8

*Robert Wade, Governing the Market: Economic Theory and the Role of Government in

East Asian Industrialization (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1990), chapter 1 (on electronic reserves)

*Howard Handelman, “The Political Economy of Third World Development,” in The Challenge of Third World Development (New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 1996), pp. 216-244 (on electronic reserves)

 

Political Change: Transition from Authoritarian Rule to Constitutional Democracy

Readings: *Nicholas Eberstadt, “Taiwan and South Korea: the ‘Democratization’ of Outlier States,” World Affairs, vol. 155, no. 2, 1992 (on e-reserves)

*Jauhsieh Joseph Wu, Taiwan’s Democratization: Forces Behind the New Momentum (Hong Kong, Oxford University Press, 1995), Chapter 3 (on e-reserves)

*Tun-jen Cheng and Eun Mee Kim, “Making Democracy: Generalizing the South Korean Case,” in Edward Friedman, ed., The Politics of Democratization: Generalizing East Asian Experience (Boulder, CO: Westview, 1994), pp. 148-160 (on e-reserves)

 

East Asian Security and the U.S. Foreign Policy

Readings:*James C.F. Wang, Comparative Asian Politics: Power, Policy, and Change (Prentice Hall, 1994), pp. 333-344

*Quansheng Zhao, “China and Major Power Relations in East Asia,” Journal of Contemporary China, vol. 10, no. 29, 2001, pp. 663-681 (on electronic reserves)

*Barry Buzan and Gerald Segal, “Rethinking East Asian Security,” Survival, vol. 36, no. 2, 1994 (on electronic reserves)

*Howard J. Wiarda, “From Cold War to Post-Cold War: Change and Continuity in U.S. Foreign and Strategic Policy,” Contributions in Political Science, vol. 366, no. 1, 1996 (on electronic reserves)

*Haruhiro Fukui and Shigeko N. Fukai, “The Role of the United States in Post-Cold War East Asian Security Affairs,” Journal of Asian and African Studies, vol. 33. No. 1, 1998 (on electronic reserves)

*Ted G. Carpenter, “Managing a Great Power Relationship: The United States, China, and East Asian Security,” The Journal of Strategic Studies, vol. 21, no. 1, 1998 (on electronic reserves)

 

—————————————————————————————————-

Term Paper Assignments and General Guidelines

 

I. PAPER ASSIGNMENTS

1.In addition to a set of homework assignments, you are required to turn in a college-level analytical paper as a requirement of this course. Your paper should be typed in double space, 15-20 pages in length, and nicely bonded. Your paper must apply aspects of the assigned readings to your topic. In additional to that, at a minimum you should use 15 sources beyond the assigned readings.

2. You must use correct citation for your paper. Plagiarism is when you use someone else’s words or ideas without attributing the proper source. Feel free to rely on someone else’s words, concepts, arguments, ideas, explanations, or descriptions, but make sure that anything you cite from the literature or anything that is not yours must be properly footnoted. Students will receive F’s for plagiarized work. It will be always helpful to search the Internet for the reference. But your main sources of citation must be academic journals and books. Acadmic Elite Search or ArticleFirst in library databases on the web is the best place to start with. You can always ask the reference desk for assistance.

3. Late paper will not be accepted without a convincing excuse. You must try to write a sensibly organized paper with a clear central theme.

4. You should be free to choose a topic on your own. But, do not turn in a paper that was prepared for a different class. As a general rule, a topic for the paper must be closely related to aspects of the subject matter under topics covered in this course. Therefore, a self-selected topic for the paper must be submitted in writing and approved by the instructor as early as possible.Your paper with a self-selected topic will not be accepted (you will receive a zero score) without my pre-approval. You are required to submit a topic proposal, which includes “What is the paper topic,” “what is your research question,” “why this question,” “how to solve this question,” and “what are the major sources for your research” on or before the deadline.

5. No cover or binding on your paper please! Include a cover sheet with your paper title and your name, and email the paper to me.

6. Your paper must conform to college-level standards of quality. Poor grammar or spelling and improper citation style will be counted against your grade. Your paper will be graded on the following criteria: (1) your command of the material; (2) your analytical and critical skills; (3) your writing skills (clarity, organization, grammar, and spelling); (4) your use of the readings; and (5) those critical aspects of writing a good paper addressed in the general guidelines. By consulting the following general guidelines, you should get a good idea of how your paper will be evaluated.

II. GENERAL GUIDELINES

There are two general types of college-level paper: research paper and analytical paper. A research paper, strictly speaking, should be conducted by utilizing statistical methods or experimental methods and operationalizing the key research elements in the research process, such as problem, hypothesis, research design, measurement, data collection, data analysis, and generalization. Your term paper belongs to the latter. An analytical paper can be further classified into “descriptive” and “explanatory.” Your paper can be either a descriptive or explanatory analytical paper. Both require you to explain something. If you describe changes of institutions, patterns of behavior, or policies, you are not simply describing them for nothing, but for explaining something. A paper that merely reports what others have said or describes something will give you neither psychic satisfaction nor a good grade. Your task is not merely to assemble facts, but to interpret or explain the facts. An analytical paper is the most basic one; but it is not easy to do a good job. I will try to make it as simple and clear as possible in the following.

  1. To do a good work on an analytical paper, just as for any type of paper, the first thing you need is to choose or set up a topic, such as “Democratic Transition: A comparative Study of Taiwan and Vietnam,” which usually defines the parameters within which your (research) question or a thesis is proposed, the relevant literature is selected and integrated either to support or refute the thesis, your evaluation is conducted based upon the criteria you set up, and some conclusions you will draw based upon your evaluation.
  2. Your work needs a thesis/theme for a paper that opens and closes the work. The question you want to work on implies a thesis or theme. At the end of your paper, you need to complete the “circle” by linking the opening of your paper with the closing of the paper. With a thesis or theme, you can work on integration and linkages of materials – paragraph to paragraph, literature to literature. With a thesis or theme, you know what you want to do or what problem or puzzle you want to solve – you may defend or refute the thesis, or by doing so, you may come up with a synthesis – breaking the ground. This is your introduction (I. Introduction).
  3. The next step is the definitional work on some key terms and to establish evaluation criteria by which you examine the state, development, change, or reality of the subject matter. That is to say, you have to define the key term “democratic transition” or any key concepts to be used in your paper. You can do this either in your introduction section or do this as an individual part of the main body (II. Defining Key Concepts). If you choose to do this in your introduction section, you will not have this particular section, which means that you will simply borrow or accept the definition of concepts established by other major work in the literature. If you need an additional section for this work, you first search the relevant literature to synthesize the material into different definitions or contrasting views on “democratic transition” by referring to some major work in the literature, because “democratic transition” could mean different things to different peoples. Only by defining the key terms and establishing evaluation criteria, your following examination can provide a valid justification for your thesis developed in your introduction.
  4. What follows is to engage in the investigation of real world or examination of empirical facts along some dimensions through a substantial literature research. This is a major part of the paper body (III. Examination).
  5. Evaluation of the results (IV. Analysis). This is actually a concluding part of your paper. Or, this can be a substantial part of the main body of your paper, if you want to have an additional concluding section. You can do it either way; it is up to you. Only listing or lumping facts together about, for example, the religion suppression, is not sufficient; instead you need to show that you are able to draw conclusions from the materials under your investigation (or you have studied). At this stage, you can apply the criteria you have established in section I or II and draw conclusions from the material. Your conclusions are actually your interpretation of the results of your evaluation of your subject, and expected to support or restate the thesis you have proposed at the beginning – by so doing you complete the “circle.” This section should also include any insightful reflections and thought on the discussion of the subject matter. If you choose to have an additional concluding chapter, which is the most common way people choose, you simply recapture, in brief fashion, the thesis or theme proposed at the beginning, the major empirical evidence that supports or refutes the thesis, and the conclusion you have made based upon your analysis.
  6. Finally, the format of your paper is also essential. The format must always include a title page, abstract if necessary, table of contents, text or body of the paper, sections with subtitles, and footnotes or references. Do not forget to do the page number! 

Note: If you choose to do a research paper by utilizing statistical methods or experimental methods, you must first discuss with me the key research elements in the research process, such as problem, hypothesis, research design, measurement, data collection, data analysis, and generalization.

I hope these general guidelines will be helpful either for your efforts to write your paper or for your long-term benefit at university. Work hard and commit yourself to excellence, and you will always be highly rewarded. Thank you for choosing my class as the media of your leaning process. Good luck and enjoy your work.  

 

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