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What Is Your Opinion To This Robert is a 26-year-old Hispanic male. He is single and has served in the U.S. Army for the past 7 years as an Infantryman. While is military duties kept him busy, he still managed to find time to go out and enjoy life in normal day-to-day activities. However, Robert has just returned from his third overseas deployment in five years and has had more difficulty adapting back into normal daily routines than he did during his two previous deployments. Robert states that he has become withdrawn from friends, he finds himself feeling depressed and hopeless, he has little interest in activities that he formerly enjoyed, and no interest in trying new activities, as well as momentary fits of anger during non-stressful situations. He has also expressed an inability to sleep due to recurring nightmares of events experienced while deployed; he also states that he does not like to go out anymore because large crowds cause him to become tense and very jumpy. Robert’s symptoms have persisted everyday for the last six months and only after the urging of friends did he seek help; in addition, he is in relatively good health with no other expressed or apparent medical concerns or conditions. Based on the results of the DSM-IV-TR criteria, Robert appears to suffering from a diagnosis of combat related Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) (Stangor, 2010). Robert’s treatment should begin with a biological intervention such as an antidepressant and sleep aid in order to ease his adjustment back into a normal daily routine. A psychiatric consult and group therapy (so that Robert may express his feelings and emotions in a safe environment with individuals in similar situations) are recommended. Group therapy would be considered the social intervention according to the biopsychosocial model (Stangor, 2010). In addition, it would be beneficial for Robert to participate in exposure therapy in order to reduce the anxieties and hyper-vigilance associated with the aspects his deployment (Stangor, 2010), which would represent a psychological intervention. Reference: Stangor, C. (2010). Introduction to Psychology. Irvington, NY: Flat World Knowledge Inc

What Is Your Opinion  To This Robert is a 26-year-old Hispanic male. He is single and has served in the U.S. Army for the past 7 years as an Infantryman. While is military duties kept him busy, he still managed to find time to go out and enjoy life in normal day-to-day activities. However, Robert has just returned from his third overseas deployment in five years and has had more difficulty adapting back into normal daily routines than he did during his two previous deployments. Robert states that he has become withdrawn from friends, he finds himself feeling depressed and hopeless, he has little interest in activities that he formerly enjoyed, and no interest in trying new activities, as well as momentary fits of anger during non-stressful situations. He has also expressed an inability to sleep due to recurring nightmares of events experienced while deployed; he also states that he does not like to go out anymore because large crowds cause him to become tense and very jumpy.

Robert’s symptoms have persisted everyday for the last six months and only after the urging of friends did he seek help; in addition, he is in relatively good health with no other expressed or apparent medical concerns or conditions.

Based on the results of the DSM-IV-TR criteria, Robert appears to suffering from a diagnosis of combat related Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) (Stangor, 2010).

Robert’s treatment should begin with a biological intervention such as an antidepressant and sleep aid in order to ease his adjustment back into a normal daily routine. A psychiatric consult and group therapy (so that Robert may express his feelings and emotions in a safe environment with individuals in similar situations) are recommended. Group therapy would be considered the social intervention according to the biopsychosocial model (Stangor, 2010). In addition, it would be beneficial for Robert to participate in exposure therapy in order to reduce the anxieties and hyper-vigilance associated with the aspects his deployment (Stangor, 2010), which would represent a psychological intervention.

Reference:

Stangor, C. (2010). Introduction to Psychology. Irvington, NY: Flat World Knowledge Inc

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