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You are required to write a 250 words essay reply with a least 2 peer view reference and also a relevant biblical concept to support your ideas. RE: Coca-Cola India, Question 4 RE: Coca-Cola India, Question 4 Collapse Top of Form Total views: 3 (Your views: 1) Author:Aleah Hawkins Date: Thursday, February 27, 2014 9:59:38 AM EST Subject: Coca-Cola India, Question 4 4. What is your recommendation for Coke’s communication strategy? Who are they key constituents? Question What is your recommendation for Coke’s communication strategy? Who are they key constituents? Introduction When any company is faced with a crisis, they are looked upon for their response. Organizations can choose when and what they respond with, and would be wise to understand the processes behind crisis communication before doing so. Coca-Cola was faced with an international crisis and decided to respond with further research and standing strong with their defense. By taking that message and presenting it in a timely fashion with thorough follow-up to the right constituents, Coca-Cola will be able to rebound from their crisis. Answer For a company dealing with a corporate crisis it is important to not only produce an effective message, but the timing also has to be appropriate. When consumers first hear about a crisis they have different ways to respond; who they hear the message from, when they hear the message, and when they hear competing messages all effect how they will respond though. Chong and Druckman (2010) found that when people are presented with two competing messages, they are more likely to side with the message that they heard last. For Coca-Cola, their communication strategy needs to include a consistent message that shows the facts and defends their reputation. The Center for Science and Environment had put out an initial message stating that Coca-Cola products were unsafe, and Coca-Cola needs to send out a contradicting factual message that will help to sway consumers back to their product. After their first stream of messages, Coca-Cola needs to continue to monitor the response and send follow-up messages. Speculand (2012) found that most companies are skilled at promoting initial messages, but fail to create a follow-up communication strategy. These follow-up message need to be sent to the main constituents involved, including the common Indian consumer as well as the Indian government. Brocato, Peterson, and Crittenden (2012) research reactions to crisis communications and found when organizations denied or gave justifications for the crisis, the consumers lowered their negative views in regards to the company. By sending out the right messages to the right people, Coca-Cola can recover from this crisis. Biblical Integration Throughout the New Testament, Jesus continually spreads his message of salvation through parables, conversations, and stories. He had a simple message but constantly had to continue to spread His news to different people, as well as repeatedly remind His disciples why He was there. Organizations can take this example for their own communication strategies, by remembering that a message is never truly finished being sent, and follow-up is always important. Conclusion For the Coca-Cola Company, they were faced with accusations that significantly impacted their company and their profits. By going forward with a communication strategy that is timely and includes a follow up, Coca-Cola will be able to help return to profitability by reducing fears. References Brocato, E. D., Peterson, R. A., & Crittenden, V. L. (2012). When things go wrong: Account strategy following a corporate crisis event. Corporate Reputation Review, 15(1), 35-51. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.liberty.edu:2048/docview/921259918 Chong, D., & Druckman, J. N. (2010). Dynamic public opinion: Communication effects over time. The American Political Science Review, 104(4), 663-680. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.liberty.edu:2048/docview/840626799 Speculand, R. (2012). Why communication of strategy frequently fails. Strategic HR Review, 11(6), 353-355. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.liberty.edu:2048/docview/1261277806 Bottom of Form

You are required to write a 250 words essay reply with a least 2 peer view reference and also a relevant biblical concept to support your ideas.

RE: Coca-Cola India, Question 4 RE: Coca-Cola India, Question 4

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Total views: 3 (Your views: 1)

Author:Aleah Hawkins
Date: Thursday, February 27, 2014 9:59:38 AM EST
Subject: Coca-Cola India, Question 4

4. What is your recommendation for Coke’s communication strategy? Who are they key constituents?

Question

What is your recommendation for Coke’s communication strategy? Who are they key constituents?

Introduction

When any company is faced with a crisis, they are looked upon for their response. Organizations can choose when and what they respond with, and would be wise to understand the processes behind crisis communication before doing so. Coca-Cola was faced with an international crisis and decided to respond with further research and standing strong with their defense. By taking that message and presenting it in a timely fashion with thorough follow-up to the right constituents, Coca-Cola will be able to rebound from their crisis.

Answer

For a company dealing with a corporate crisis it is important to not only produce an effective message, but the timing also has to be appropriate. When consumers first hear about a crisis they have different ways to respond; who they hear the message from, when they hear the message, and when they hear competing messages all effect how they will respond though. Chong and Druckman (2010) found that when people are presented with two competing messages, they are more likely to side with the message that they heard last. For Coca-Cola, their communication strategy needs to include a consistent message that shows the facts and defends their reputation. The Center for Science and Environment had put out an initial message stating that Coca-Cola products were unsafe, and Coca-Cola needs to send out a contradicting factual message that will help to sway consumers back to their product.
After their first stream of messages, Coca-Cola needs to continue to monitor the response and send follow-up messages. Speculand (2012) found that most companies are skilled at promoting initial messages, but fail to create a follow-up communication strategy. These follow-up message need to be sent to the main constituents involved, including the common Indian consumer as well as the Indian government. Brocato, Peterson, and Crittenden (2012) research reactions to crisis communications and found when organizations denied or gave justifications for the crisis, the consumers lowered their negative views in regards to the company. By sending out the right messages to the right people, Coca-Cola can recover from this crisis.

Biblical Integration

Throughout the New Testament, Jesus continually spreads his message of salvation through parables, conversations, and stories. He had a simple message but constantly had to continue to spread His news to different people, as well as repeatedly remind His disciples why He was there. Organizations can take this example for their own communication strategies, by remembering that a message is never truly finished being sent, and follow-up is always important.

Conclusion

For the Coca-Cola Company, they were faced with accusations that significantly impacted their company and their profits. By going forward with a communication strategy that is timely and includes a follow up, Coca-Cola will be able to help return to profitability by reducing fears.

References

Brocato, E. D., Peterson, R. A., & Crittenden, V. L. (2012). When things go wrong: Account strategy following a corporate crisis event. Corporate Reputation Review, 15(1), 35-51. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.liberty.edu:2048/docview/921259918

Chong, D., & Druckman, J. N. (2010). Dynamic public opinion: Communication effects over time. The American Political Science Review, 104(4), 663-680. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.liberty.edu:2048/docview/840626799

Speculand, R. (2012). Why communication of strategy frequently fails. Strategic HR Review, 11(6), 353-355. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.liberty.edu:2048/docview/1261277806

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